IMCoS
     My Account      Basket      Purchase   Order by phone: +44 (0)7764 165 300
Quick Search
 
Advanced Search
Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter
 
Catalogue
ANTIQUE MAPS (1658) Recent Acquisitions (32) Summer Sale! (99) Recent Sales (1576)
Recent Acquisitions
Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
£160.00
View by Cartographer
Basket
0 items
Currencies
My Account
E-Mail Address:

Password:
 
Information
About Us
How to Order
Shipping & Returns
Privacy Notice
Conditions of Use
Cartographers
Contact Us
London Map Fairs
Ortelius, Abraham: SOLD Maris Pacifici

Price: £0.00

  • SOLD
  • Date: 1598
  • Condition: AA
  • Colour: Hand colour
  • Size: 19 3/4 x 13 5/8 inches.
Description

From the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. The first printed map of the Pacific and acknowledged to be a cornerstone of cartography and one of the most beautiful and decorative of the Ortelius maps. The map grossly underestimates the size of the Pacific and includes an early representation of the North American west coast and New Guinea. Wagner is quoted as saying the map "constitutes a distinct departure, being unlike any map of the Northwest coast published before 1589". Sources for this map include Hogenberg's very rare map of the Americas, also from 1589, which has recently been shown to have been a prototype for the Ortelius Maris Pacifici. Ortelius did improve on Hogenburg by making changes in the nomenclature of the west coast and by a changed depiction of the Gulf of California. Ortelius here has removed the bulge from South America and has imposed a substantially reduced east-west extent of North America. A turtle shaped Japan is probably derived from a 1568 manuscript from Vaz Dourado.

French Text on verso. The margins are clean with the following dimensions: Top Margin: 2.5 inches, Bottom Margin: 2.5 inches, Left Margin: 1 inch, Right Margin: 1 inch.

In very good condition with a only small restored tear in the bottom margin.

Van den Broecke # 12.

SOLD Maris Pacifici
Click to enlarge
North West America
North West America 
South America
South America